One of the perks of being the managing editor at AIGA is spending my mornings reading design stories and calling it “work.” But not everyone gets to (or wants to) peruse RSS feeds like it’s their job. Consider this a hit list (as well as a few things you may have missed) of the most interesting things I’ve and seen, read, and watched this week. You can follow along every other day on Instagram @AIGAdesign and on Twitter @AIGAdesign.

This week I…

wave buh-bye to Internet Explorer, which joins its buddy Netscape in the internet graveyard. Good riddance.

…like Twitter’s new 2×2-grid homepage prototype over the 3×3-grid design, though how organizing content by category (instead of, y’know, seeing everything in your feed all at once) like a traditional editorial website will actually work is still up in the air. As is, apparently, the decision to redesign the homepage at all. Hey guys, anything is better than what you have now.

abbey-road-logo2

…love how Abbey Road Studios’ new logo manages to maintain the look of its original mark, pay tribute to famous references (like that one Beatles album cover), and still feel fresh. Bravo to London studio Form for the “chevron” concept and execution.

…can’t wait to see the Mad Men sculpture designed by Pentagram when it’s unveiled on Monday outside the Time & Life Building in Rockefeller Center, though I’m not sure I agree with Gothamist’s assumption that it’ll be a realistic likeness of the cast members, and feel even less certain about circulating speculations that more sculptural odes to actual ad legends are in our future.

…high five NOWNESS on their fifth anniversary—congrats, guys! Celebrate with this fun video of various five-fingered gestures (plus some one-fingered salutes, just for kicks).

…revisit AIGA’s award-winning celebratedesign.org after hearing the good news that Second Story, who designed the site, picked up a SXSW Interactive Innovation Award for best Responsive Design. Go team!<

…barely catch up on Michael Bierut’s talk at Design Indaba, where he spoke about how he approached writing a book about his work (which turns out to be a lot like how he approaches design) before becoming completely overwhelmed by the hourly updates on that other big conference going on right now via the TEDblog. There’s no way I’ll ever catch up, but Dave Isay’s TED Prize talk about his StoryCorps wish, why we’re going to live on Mars sooner than we think, and how speakers can prepare for their 18 minutes of fame are good places to start.

…try to pick my favorite cover from the hundreds created by five designers, two letterers, and an illustrator for HausFrau: A Novel, which Random House’s executive art director swears isn’t an exercise in obsessive-compulsive design, but a necessary part of “finding a way to convey the tone of the book without revealing plot details.” Maybe it’s the result of being teased with SO many other options, but the final result is kind of a letdown.

elasticwebbing-book-cover

…cross The History and Romance of Elastic Webbing off my reading list on the advice of The Paris Review’s blog editor Dan Piepenbring. Here on Eye on Design, we’ve been talking up the value of judging books by their covers, but unfortunately for Dan, he judged poorly:

“When I saw the cover of Clifford A. Richmond’s The History and Romance of Elastic Webbing (1946) making the rounds on Tumblr, I knew at once I had to have it… I imagined—based solely on the presence of Romance in the title, and that handsome gilt typeface—that Richmond would be a lively historian, an eccentric, an obsessive, dedicated to teasing out the poesy in elastic webs… But The History and Romance of Elastic Webbing is only an arid, methodical look at midcentury elastic webbing firms, large and small, up and down the East Coast. To call it ‘inside baseball’ is doing it a favor, because baseball is a sport, and some people are entertained by sports.”

…can definitely understand the allure of watching page after luscious page of paper company’s Arjowiggins latest collection fall from the sky in The Paper Book’s promo video for their latest sampler.

…add a visit to French design concept shop Merci to my to-do list (right after “buy plane ticket to Paris”) to check out “Écriture (Writing),” an in-store exhibit of sorts that presents “historic and iconic paper goods and desktop accoutrements” alongside more contemporary offerings. Or maybe it’s better that I’m NYC-bound for the moment; as a bonafide pen-and-paper addict who can’t walk by a stationer without picking up a newfangled pencil or notecard at the very least, I’d probably spend my next month’s rent on the store’s gorgeous Messograf Caliper Pens and Haibara envelopes (above).