Unlike painters and other fine artists who tend to stick with materials unchanged for centuries (linseed oil, ground pigments, gesso applied to linen canvas stretched tight over wood frames), type designers work with tools dependent on new and evolving technologies in order to create and reproduce their work. Although time-honored methods such as letterpress remain in the picture, in the past few decades digitally animated type for screens of all kinds has expanded typographic horizons and given designers a whole new playground to explore. Animography is a foundry established by Calango, an Amsterdam-based studio devoted to distributing a well-curated range of animated typefaces for use online, in presentations, the big screen, or anywhere a designer would like to see type explode, reassemble, vanish, or visually entertain (think title sequences, TV commercials, on-stage concert graphics, etc.).

The studio’s founder, motion director and designer Jeroen Krielaars, created his first animated typeface as an experiment to combine two of his design loves: motion and modularity. Feeling a need to dive into the world of moving letterforms a bit deeper, he made two more animated typefaces and soon decided to move them from his own website onto a dedicated site of their own, to open the door for other designers to collaborate and license their work.

Courtesy Animography/Jeroen Krielaars.
Courtesy Animography/Jeroen Krielaars.

Animography offers nearly three dozen lively options. Burstype squirts around to form itself out of flying paint, while Amelie drops down from the top of the screen like falling rain. Some are available as both static and animated alphabets. Each glyph is a separate composition, and all the glyphs within a typeface can be customized at once. “The colors are always changeable, and other settings such as timing or line width are different for each typeface,” says Krielaars.  

He strives to offer a balanced collection with each addition bringing something new to the table. “I don’t want to fill the store up with all kinds of wacky display typefaces that are hard to implement into real life projects,” Krielaars says. “At the moment, I’d like to see some good animated serifs. We have one in the works, but there’s room for more. If anyone has a good concept for that, get in touch.”

Who’s in? Send proposals and inquiries to hello [at] animography.net

Courtesy Animography/Jeroen Krielaars.
Courtesy Animography/Jeroen Krielaars.